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How to Make a Book Jacket For a Book Report


Book-jacket book reports are a creative way to represent a story you read. They are also a good way to give others an overview of the book, as well as show what you learned from it.

How to Fold a Book Jacket For a Book Report

Obtain a piece of construction or poster paper that is 11 inches wide and 24 inches long. Just make certain the paper is easy to fold. Poster board will not work. If you have difficulty finding a piece of paper this size, check a local office-supply store, such as Staples or Office Max. You might have to get a sheet that is larger than 11x24 and cut it down.

Lay the paper lengthwise on a flat surface.

From the left side to the right side, measure in 4 inches and draw a thin, light vertical line from the top of the sheet to the bottom.

Measure in 7 more inches from the line you just made, or 11 inches from the left edge, and draw another vertical line from the top of the sheet to the bottom of the sheet.

Measure in 2 more inches from the line you just made, or 13 inches from the left edge, and draw another vertical line from the top of the sheet to the bottom of the sheet.

Measure in 7 more inches from the line you just made, or 20 inches from the left edge, and draw another vertical line from the top of the sheet to the bottom of the sheet. This will leave a four-inch section on the right edge.

Fold from left to right along each of the two lines on the left side.

Make a fold from right to left along the remaining two lines on the right side. When you are finished with the folds, you will have what resembles a book jacket with inside flaps, a spine, and a front and back cover.

How to Use the Book Jacket For a Book Report

Use light, small numbers to number the panels on the side that appears to be the outside of the book jacket from 1 to 5. These will be erased later and will only be used as reference points.

Flip the jacket over. Repeat Step 1 for these panels, which will form the inside of the book jacket, using the numbers 6 to 10. Again, these will be reference points.

Attach a picture of yourself or draw a self-portrait near the top of Panel 1, and write a brief autobiography underneath it. Include your name and age, as well as hobbies and other interesting facts about yourself.

Write three or four interesting points about the book at the top half of Panel 2, but do not summarize the book. The bottom half of Panel 2 should contain a short review of the book, including your opinions on why you liked or disliked the book.

Put the title of the book and the name of the publisher in Panel 3. As this will represent the "spine" of the book, be creative.

Write the title, author's name, your name and the due date of the report on Panel 4. Include a picture that represents the book. This panel will be the front of the report, so use your imagination to make it interesting.

Write a summary that outlines the opening, middle and conclusion of the book on Panels 5 and 6. Do not include your opinion of the book, just the important facts of the story.

List all of the chapters in the book in Panel 7, and include the chapter names when applicable. Write one or two sentences outlining the main point of each chapter.

Write the name of the book's main character in Panel 8, as well as five adjectives that describe that character. The adjectives should be words that are not typically part of your vocabulary, so use a thesaurus to find them. Be creative with your lettering on this panel.

Divide Panel 9 into three boxes, leaving room for captions beneath each one. In each box, illustrate a problem that the main character faced in the story. Write a one-sentence caption to go along with each drawing.

Write down five words that you did not know from your book in Panel 10. List them alphabetically and include their definitions.

Tip
  • Use markers, crayons, paint, glitter and other art supplies to decorate the book jacket.
Items you will need
Construction or poster paper (11 inches x 24 inches) Ruler Pencil
About the Author

Cooper Temple has over 15 years of experience writing procedural and training material for a Fortune 500 company. His articles specialize in productivity programs and other business-related software.