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How to Cite an Adaptation in APA


When writing a paper, you might include elements you did not create: figures, such as pictures, charts or maps, or tables, which are adaptations of non-illustrated text from sources. APA style allows you to cite these adaptations as noted in the APA manual's specialized resource, itself an adaptation.

Citing Journal Article Adaptations

A table is non-illustrative text. A reference to a journal article's adaptation includes the word "note" italicized, a description, article title, author, year and journal title, volume/page number, copyright year and copyright owner, and "adapted with permission."

Journal Article Citation Example

A Journal Article adaptation example is:

Note (in italics). Special Olympics events strengthen adult-child bonds. Adapted from "Support for Parents of Special Needs Children," by H. Bond, 2010, Parental Psychology (in italics), 52, p. 387. Copyright 2010 by Psychological Parenting Association. Adapted with permission.

Citing a Book Adaptation

A book adaptation citation uses, after the date, the city of publication and publisher, plus copyright date and information. Example:

Note (in italics). Strategies for Parental Coping. Reprinted from Special Needs Parenting (in italics) (p. 210), Boston: Parenting Publications. Copyright 2011 by the Parents for Special Needs Children Association. Reprinted with permission.

Citing Figures Such as Charts

A figure/illustration from a journal article includes "Figure#" in italics, description, article title, author, year, journal title, volume, page, copyright year/holder and "adapted with permission." Example:

Figure 4 (in italics). Model of special needs home plan. Adapted from "Support for Parents of Special Needs Children," by H. Bond, 2010, Parental Psychology (in italics), 52, p. 394. Copyright 2010 by Psychological Parenting Association. Adapted with permission.

References
  • Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition); How to Caption Tables and Figures from Other Sources
About the Author

Michael Stratford is a National Board-certified and Single Subject Credentialed teacher with a Master of Science in educational rehabilitation (University of Montana, 1995). He has taught English at the 6-12 level for more than 20 years. He has written extensively in literary criticism, student writing syllabi and numerous classroom educational paradigms.

Photo Credits
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