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How to Cite a Classroom Handout


Write proper citations when referencing material that you did not create on your own. Using another persons' research and words can be considered plagiarism if the material is not properly cited. If material is used and not cited, the student runs the risk of faulting their academic integrity. Facts and specific data or research should be cited for verification and to give credit where credit is due. Sources can be found through a variety of outlets, including classroom handouts.

MLA Format

Write the author's last name and first name, separated by a comma. Add a period after the first name.

Example: Johnson, Chris.

Leave a space and insert the title of the handout, surrounded by quotation marks, period at the end. Leave another space and state the title of the publication (if available), followed by a period.

Example: Johnson, Chris. "Creating Goals." Classroom Behaviors: Encouraging Positive Behavior.

Identify the paper as a handout, list the course name and the professor's name. A space will follow the period after the title of the publication and insert the word, Handout, followed by a period. Insert another space and put the title of the course, a period, and the professor's name, period. You should put parenthesis around the professor's name.

Example: Johnson, Chris. "Creating Goals." Classroom Behaviors: Encouraging Positive Behavior. Handout. Creative Writing. (Professor Jane Doe.)

Add a space after the professor's name and insert the name of the school where you received the handout, followed by a period. Leave a space and add the date you received the publication, add a period. The last word will be the way you received the publication, normally a print publication, followed by a period.

Example: Johnson, Chris. "Creating Goals." Classroom Behaviors: Encouraging Positive Behavior. Handout. Creative Writing. (Professor Jane Doe.) St. Louis University. Jan. 2011. Print

APA Format

Write the author's last name and first initial. Follow the last name with a comma and the first initial with a period.

Example: Johnson, C.

Add the date of publication after the period and the title of the handout. Insert the words, "Class Handout" after the title. Put parentheses around the date and a period after the parentheses. Insert brackets around "Class Handout" and a period on the outside of the brackets.

Example: Johnson, C. (2007). Class Behaviors [Class Handout].

Add the name of the class you received the handout, the place you received it, city and state. Insert a comma after the class, place received, and city. A period belongs after the state.

Example: Johnson, C. (2007). Class Behaviors [Class Handout]. Creative Writing, University of Missouri, St. Louis, Missouri.

Chicago/Turabian Style

The Chicago/Turabian style of citation can be done two different ways. The subject and classroom guidelines will determine which method to use. The notes and bibliography version usually applies to subject matter regarding literature, history and arts. In the notes and bibliography version, write the author's first and last name followed by a comma.

Example: Chris Johnson,

Follow the comma with the title of the handout, where the handout was presented, the city it was presented in, state and date you received it. Insert quotations around the title of the handout and parentheses around the places where you received the handout, city, state and date. Add a period to the end of the citation.

Example: Chris Johnson, "Class Behaviors" (Handout received in Creative Writing with Professor Jane Doe, St. Louis, Missouri, Dec. 21, 2009).

The author-date version of citation is usually applied towards sciences such as natural, social and physical science. Write the author's last name and title of the paper. Insert a comma after the last name, quotations around the title and a period at the end.

Example: Johnson, "Class Behaviors".

Add the full reference at the end of the paper when writing the author-date version.

Example: Chris Johnson, "Class Behaviors" (Handout received in Creative Writing with Professor Jane Doe, St. Louis, Missouri, Dec. 21, 2009).

About the Author

Tabitha Harwell has been writing since 2008, with articles appearing in local publications and various websites. Her background includes a career in the fashion and beauty industry. Harwell holds a Bachelor of Arts in public relations.

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