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How to Cite Interviews From YouTube


Different writing styles provide different templates for formatting a YouTube interview citation. Depending on which style you use, you may need to note the file type, URL and your access date for the interview.

Reference List

To cite a YouTube source in American Psychological Association format, list the name of the author, with last name followed by first name. Include the YouTube screen name under which the video was posted in brackets afterward, followed by a period. If you only have the screen name, use this in place of the name, without brackets. Follow the name with the date of the YouTube video in parentheses, followed by a period, as follows:

Bruer, Y. B. [ESFI]. (2012, November 10).

Write the title of the video in italics, then note that it is a video file in brackets. Write "Retrieved from" and include the URL of the video:

Bruer, Y. B. [ESFI]. (2012, November 10). Pro Pass at Lone Star Clash 2: Sean "Day[9]" Plott interview [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJPhOwx91w8

In Modern Language Association format, include the video title in quotes and note the name of the website and organization of the website -- both YouTube -- after the file type. The URL is not included, but note the last date you accessed the Web page at the end of your citation:

Bruer, Yosef B. "Pro Pass at Lone Star Clash 2: Sean "Day[9]" Plott interview" Online video clip. YouTube. YouTube, 10 Nov. 2012. Web. 10 April 2015.

Chicago has two styles of citation. Author-date uses parenthetical in-text citations and a reference list, while note-bibliography uses footnote/endnote in-text citations and a bibliography at the end of the paper. In both cases, note the organization or channel that published the video and the length of the video:

Author-Date:

Bruer, Yosef B. "Pro Pass at Lone Star Clash 2: Sean "Day[9]" Plott interview." YouTube video, 18:03. Posted by ESFI, 10 Nov. 2012, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJPhOwx91w8

Note-Bibliography

Bruer, Yosef B. "Pro Pass at Lone Star Clash 2: Sean "Day[9]" Plott interview." YouTube video, 18:03. Posted by ESFI, 10 Nov. 2012. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJPhOwx91w8

In-Text Citation

In APA format, when you quote or paraphrase your source, include a parentheses after the reference to note the source it came from. Include the name of the source's author and the year -- but not month and day -- of publication:

Plott notes -- and is astounded by -- the organizational skill of the tournament (Bruer, 2012).

In MLA format, you do not need to note the date of your source, only the author name:

Plott notes -- and is astounded by -- the organizational skill of the tournament (Bruer).

Chicago's author-date style of citation is similar to APA style. Include author name and year of publication, but without the comma separating them:

Plott notes -- and is astounded by -- the organizational skill of the tournament (Bruer 2012).

In Chicago note-bibliography style, an in-text reference uses a footnote or an endnote, which involves the same format as the bibliography citation, only with commas in place of periods:

  1. Bruer, Yosef B., "Pro Pass at Lone Star Clash 2: Sean "Day[9]" Plott interview." YouTube video, 18:03, Posted by ESFI, 10 Nov. 2012, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJPhOwx91w8

If you reference a source more than once, each citation past the first uses a shortened version of the author name and title:

  1. Bruer, "Pro Pass."

If you cite the same source multiple time in a row, use "Ibid." for each source past the first:

  1. Ibid.

Tips
  • You can shorten a quote by using ellipses in place of words you omit from the quote. For example: Plott says "the community's going . . . I wanna do that."
  • If you quote dialogue back and forth between the interviewer and the person being interviewed, use a block quote. Include a blank line between the body of your text and the quote, and indent the quote. Include a blank line between each of the interviewer and interviewee's lines:
  • BRUER: Do you think it will be easier or harder down the road?
  • PLOTT: I think that there's a number of things that are becoming easier, and a number that are becoming harder.
About the Author

Jon Zamboni began writing professionally in 2010. He has previously written for The Spiritual Herald, an urban health care and religious issues newspaper based in New York City, and online music magazine eBurban. Zamboni has a Bachelor of Arts in religious studies from Wesleyan University.

Photo Credits
  • Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images