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How to Cite Meeting Minutes in APA Style


When a company or other organization conducts a meeting, a secretary takes minutes, or written notes recording what is discussed in the meeting. These minutes are a helpful tool for organization members or outside researchers to find past information about that organization's activities. If you are writing a paper about a company, referencing its meeting minutes shows your reader that company's internal processes. When you reference minutes in your paper, cite them using the proper American Psychological Association, or APA, style. A solid citation will let your reader know where your information comes from.

Reference List

If a source is referenced in your paper, its information is placed on a reference page after the last page of your paper. First you'll need to name the author of the minutes. This is recorded as the last name of the author, followed by a comma and his first -- and middle, if applicable -- initials. For minutes, the author will be the secretary who took those minutes:

Charles, G.A.

If you do not have the secretary's information, use the name of the organization instead, followed by a period:

National Citation Foundation.

Include the date of the meeting in parentheses. This should be formatted as the year followed by a comma, then the month and day of the meeting. Place a period outside the parentheses:

(1998, March 9).

Include the title of the meeting in italics, followed by a period. Capitalize only the first word of the meeting title and the first word of any subtitles. Proper nouns should always be capitalized:

Meeting of the APA senior management: J. Gunther presiding.

Include the location from which you retrieved the minutes. If you retrieved them from company archives, include the organization location and the name, separated by a colon and followed by a period:

Washington, DC: National Science Foundation.

If you listed the author of the minutes as the organization, you can simply include "Author" in place of the organization name.

Washington, DC: Author.

If you retrieved the minutes from a website instead of the company archives, write out "Retrieved from" followed by the URL for the minutes and a period.

In-Text Citations

When you reference or quote minutes in the body of your text, include an in-text citation after the phrase or sentence in which you referenced your source.

Place an open parenthesis after the last word in your sentence. The first piece of information in your in-text citation is the name of the minutes' author. Use the last name of the secretary or the name of the company.

Place a comma after the author's name, then include the year of the minutes. You do not need to note the minutes' month or day.

If you directly quote the source in your paper, place a comma after the year, and include the page number(s) of the minutes on which the quote appears. Use "p." before the page number if only one page is cited or "pp." if you are citing multiple pages.

Place a close parentheses at the end of your in-text citation. The period for a sentence should appear after the close parentheses of the in-text citation.

About the Author

Jon Zamboni began writing professionally in 2010. He has previously written for The Spiritual Herald, an urban health care and religious issues newspaper based in New York City, and online music magazine eBurban. Zamboni has a Bachelor of Arts in religious studies from Wesleyan University.

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