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How to Cite a Policy in MLA


The Modern Language Association gives style and citation guidelines to writers working in the humanities in its "MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers." The "MLA Handbook" asks that writers cite sources both in-text and on a separate reference page. In-text citations generally include the author's last name and a page number, while entries appearing on the list of works cited generally include an author's full name and complete publication information the source you are citing.

Print Sources

Give an abbreviated version of the policy's name enclosed in quotation marks and parentheses to begin your in-text citation. For example:

T-shirts are not permitted ("Indianapolis").

Give the page number from which you are taking your information.

T-shirts are not permitted ("Indianapolis" 3).

Refer to your source in the body of your sentence if possible.

The Dress Code Policy of the Indianapolis Public Schools Board of Commissioners states that female students may not wear T-shirts (3).

Give the author or group responsible for the policy, the name of the policy in italics, the city and state of publication, the publisher and year of publication to complete your works cited entry.

Indianapolis Public Schools Board of Commissioners. Dress Code Policy. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana GPD, 2008.

Specify that you are citing a print source by putting "Print" at the end of your entry. (See References 1)

Indianapolis Public Schools Board of Commissioners. Dress Code Policy. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana GPD, 2008. Print.

Web Sources

Give an abbreviated version of the policy title enclosed in quotation marks and parentheses to complete your in-text citation.

All shirts must have collars ("K-12").

Give a page number if the web source you are using includes one -- this is very rare.

Give the web source's title enclosed in quotation marks, the publisher or operator of the site hosting the source in italics, the name of the site hosting the source, the date (if available), the word "Web" and the date you accessed the source to complete your works cited entry.

"Student Dress Code Policy." Detroit Public Schools. detroitk12.org. n.d. Web. 25 June 2011.

References
  • "The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers"; Modern Language Association; 2008
About the Author

Thomas Colbyry is a writer living in Marquette, Mich. Currently pursuing a B.A. in English, he works as a writing tutor and contributes book reviews to several publications. Colbyry often covers topics related to literature, specializing in early modern, Restoration, 18th-century and Victorian British literature, as well as the literature of Japan.