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How to Cite the World Almanac in APA


Plagiarism is literary lip-syncing. Though it is easier and less-taxing to use another author's words and ideas in place of your own, the practice is scholastically and ethically wrong. Remaining aware of your sources and always being careful to credit those sources properly is one way of avoiding even inadvertent plagiarism. The American Psychological Association (APA) provides citation guidelines to guide you in crediting your sources. If one of your sources is "The World Almanac and Book of Facts 2011," for example, the APA has a recommended citation style.

Write the last name of the editor followed by a comma, then the first initials of the editor followed by (Ed.) and a period. For example, Janssen, S. (Ed.).

Write the year of publication in parentheses followed by a period. For example, Janssen, S. (Ed.). (2011).

Write the title of the almanac, followed by a period. For example, Janssen, S. (Ed.). (2011). The world almanac and book of facts 2011.

Write the city of publication followed by a colon. For example, Janssen, S. (Ed.). (2011). The world almanac and book of facts 2011. New York:

Write the name of the publisher followed by a period. For example, Janssen, S. (Ed.). (2011). The world almanac and book of facts 2011. New York: Infobase Learning.

Tip
  • In a real citation, the title of the almanac should be in italics.
References
  • "Publication Manual of the American Psycholological Association"; American Psychological Association; 2010; pp. 204-5
About the Author

John Woloch writes professionally for various websites. He has published in the Dutch journal "Crux" and writes frequently on oil painting, classical languages and topics involving math and biochemistry. Woloch holds a Master of Arts in English from the University of Chicago, a Master of Arts in classics from Ohio State University and a postbaccalaureate pre-medical degree from Georgetown University.

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