menu

How to Take Care of Your Singing Voice


Singing for fun or profit can bring a lot of joy into your life. However, keeping your singing voice healthy takes time and commitment. Be good to your voice and your voice will remain healthy for many years to come.

Rest your speaking voice. Remember that abusing your speaking voice directly affects your singing. Don't yell at football games or at your husband. Talking over traffic noises while on the freeway or speaking over a noisy air conditioner can put a strain on your voice. Don't whisper. This is also hard on your vocal cords. Become aware of how you speak. Listen to yourself.

Drink viscous teas. Tea made from Slippery Elm Bark coats your throat and is greatly soothing. Yogi tea's Throat Comfort is a healthy organic tea that should be part of your vocal hygiene.

Strike a Yoga pose. You don't have to be a Yoga lover to learn a few simple poses to help your voice. Try the Lion Pose to relax and open up the voice.

Wear a turtleneck shirt or sweater. Turtle necks are wonderful protection in the winter or if you have a cold. Keep this handy garment on all year round to keep your voice box warm and ready to sing. Diane Keaton does it, so why can't you? Brian McKnight also wears them all the time.

Sip water when you are performing. If you are on stage don't be afraid to sip between songs. If you sing rock you don't have to be dainty about it. Spray it in your mouth and face! Be theatrical but just make sure the water gets down your throat.

Rest. This step cannot be emphasized enough. Tired bodies and brains do not carry voices well. Sleep promotes maximum cell repair. After a long session of performing your body needs sleep to fix the wear on your throat.

Exercise! A sluggish body diminishes vocal potential.Voices respond well to living in a healthy body. Exercise does not mean you have to stomp and punch yourself into oblivion. Find something you like. Bike riding or tango lessons are good. Swimming is excellent for singers.

Warning
  • Do not use lozenges or throat sprays that numb soreness or pain as you may oversing and cause serious vocal damage.
About the Author

This article was written by the Pen & the Pad team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information. To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about Pen & the Pad, contact us