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How to Get Paid for Writing Columns Online


"There is no scarcity of opportunity to make a living at what you love; there's only scarcity of resolve to make it happen." Dr. Wayne W. Dyer's advice is well suited for most writers who want to do what they love. You can make money writing online if you are dedicated to your craft and marketing your skills.

Find the Opportunities

Search the web for writing opportunities. Peter Bowerman, author of "The Well-Fed Writer," suggests that many online freelance sites drive writing fees down. He did point out two writers who bid on and get higher fees by producing quality work and demanding higher fees.

Build online clips and links. Write for free to build a portfolio of print and online work to use for writing samples. Have proposal and cover letters written and ready to go with your clips. Always adapt samples and letters to match the writing job.

Make connections online. Social networking is not for kids anymore. Building good online connections will lead to writing gigs. Contribute to forums, write comments, review books and be digitally helpful. This will make positive connections that can lead to writing opportunities.

Make contacts offline. Face to face connections at conferences, workshops and professional meetings will put you in the mind of someone looking for a good writer. Clark Howard, consumer advocate and talk show host, suggests that most jobs are given to people you have met in person.

Submit ideas to online web managers. Most web managers are looking for good content and are willing to pay for it. Suggest your idea or write a query letter to get your column online.

Tip
  • Improve your writing skills at any cost. Work on exercises at grammar websites, take a writing course and read grammar books. Be the best writer you can be.
Warning
  • Build your clips for free, then charge a fair price for writing. Do not drive the price of writing fees down by taking the lowest price. In the same manner, do not drive yourself out of the market by charging too much and being inflexible.
Items you will need
Online access.
About the Author

Lisa M. Russell is a writing professor and an instructional designer consultant. She teaches at Kennesaw State University and Ga Northwestern. She has a Master of Arts in professional writing from KSU. This published author is interested in eLearning and instructional technologies.

Photo Credits
  • Creatas Images/Creatas/Getty Images