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How to Give a Speech on Good Customer Service


Good customer service is crucial, especially in difficult economic times when every customer counts. A speech to employees on good customer service is also crucial so they understand its importance and the need for consistent application. You want employees to engage customers and connect with them; therefore, your speech should set the example as you engage and connect with your audience.

Enter the room engaging one or two audience members in a warm and friendly fashion, but brushing past, or ignoring, those nearby. Demonstrating what not to do, and what it feels like to not receive full and equal attention, will drive home the point how good customer service needs to be universal. A speaker not making an entrance or being introduced can still demonstrate this point. He can simply walk down a row of attendees, extending a greeting or handshake to some, while excluding others.

Explain that while every customer isn't "right," as the traditional saying goes, every opinion should be respected. Every complaint should also be evaluated and rectified with appropriate action.

Make sure all customers, happy or displeased, understand they are valuable to the company. Try to understand their issues and the reasons for their reactions.

Smile and be approachable. The majority of what you say is expressed nonverbally, and this is true both for you and the employees. A downcast face, folded arms and aggressive posture is not an approachable demeanor. Body language and facial expressions are key to making the customer feel welcome.

Close the speech with genuine, warm, sincere thanks to the audience for their time and attention. Showing the employees how it feels to be addressed with sincerity will leave a positive last impression. That will help them understand the importance of having each customer leave with that same feeling.

Items you will need
Note cards (optional)
Powerpoint presentation (optional)
About the Author

Michelle Barry graduated from Salve Regina University with a Bachelor of Arts in English. Since then, she has worked as a reporter for the Wilbraham-Hampden Times, an editor for Month9Books and Evolved Publishing, editor and has spent the past seven years in marketing and graphic design. She also has an extensive background in dance.

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