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How to Not Be Nervous During a Presentation


For most people, making a presentation is an unpleasant task that requires careful planning and eloquence. Speaking in front of people, especially when those people are your coworkers or superiors, can be intimidating and stressful. Ultimately, your nervousness will have a negative impact on the actual content and efficiency of your presentation. There are, however, a few techniques and tricks that can help you overcome your nervousness.

Before the Presentation

Sleep well on the night before your presentation. Being well-rested will help you relax.

Prepare and rehearse intensively the script of your presentation. Being unprepared causes your stress level to increase during the presentation, decreasing the overall quality of your performance.

Use any relaxation or meditation technique you are familiar with a couple of hours before the presentation. If you don't know any such technique, simply lie down in a quiet place, close your eyes and invoke positive thoughts.

Wear professional but comfortable clothes. An outfit that is too tight could increase your anxiety level.

During the Presentation

Make eye contact with each person in the audience. If you see someone with a friendly face, look at him whenever you experience anxiety. However, do not stare at him.

Speak clearly and at a slightly slower pace than your normal speech. Speaking too fast doesn't leave you enough time to think about your next topic and could cause you to become more nervous.

Breathe regularly while speaking. This will allow you to control your breathing pattern and help you to relax.

Warning
  • Avoid taking tranquilizing drugs before your presentation because they can cause excessive fatigue.
About the Author

John Grossman has worked as a journalist and copy editor for various publications since 1985. In the 1980s, he was in charge of the entertainment section of the "Austin Chronicle" newspaper and has, since then, worked for other publications, including golf and fitness magazines. Grossman holds a Master of Journalism from the University of Texas.

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