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How to Organize a Works Cited Page in MLA Format


Whenever you write a paper or essay where you are required to cite your sources in the text, you will need to create a "Works Cited" page at the end of your paper. The Modern Language Association has guidelines for properly citing different types of sources, as well as guidelines for how to format the Works Cited page. Everything you reference will be listed on this page in alphabetical order.

Create a new page at the end of your paper for a "Works Cited" list. Center the words "Works Cited" at the top of the page. Double space after the title and begin entering citations.

Double space between every citation.

Indent each line of your citation after the first line, creating a "hanging indent." For example, if your citation runs for three lines, indent the second and third lines under the first.

List all citations alphabetically by the author's last name. List the author's last name, followed by a comma, followed by the first name and middle name or initial. Add the rest of the citation, following MLA format for the type of citation it is.

Order citations alphabetically by title if you have more than one work by the same author. For example, if you are citing Charles Dickens' "A Bleak House" and "A Christmas Carol," list "A Bleak House" first after typing, "Dickens, Charles." For the second work, "A Christmas Carol," instead of listing Dickens again, type three dashes to indicate that it's the same author, followed by a period. List the book after that.

Use the title of a work to begin any citation where the author is unknown. This should be in alphabetical order as well, interspersed with your other entries that do have an author.

About the Author

Danielle Cort has been a freelance writer since 2008, specializing in psychology, health, education and parenting. She has published articles in "Family" magazine. Before becoming a freelance writer, Cort worked in the public policy research sector, conducting research, creating surveys and budgets. She holds a Doctor of Philosophy in social psychology from the University of Massachusetts.

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