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How to Use Chicago Style Citing


"Chicago Style" refers to the guidelines from the University of Chicago in the "Chicago Manual of Style." Writers in the humanities and social sciences generally make use of Chicago Style. A Chicago Style citation consists of two parts: a footnote or endnote and a bibliographical entry. The footnote or endnote gives your reader information on the exact place in your source where you found your information, while the bibliographical entry places your entry in a list with your other sources.

In-Text Citation

Give the author's first and last name. For example:

Julian Barnes.

Put the book's title in italics.

Julian Barnes. Something to Declare: Essays on France and French Culture.

Enclose the following in parentheses: the place of publication, the publisher and the year of publication. Separate the place from the publisher with a colon and the publisher from the year with a comma.

Julian Barnes. Something to Declare: Essays on France and French Culture. (New York: Vintage Books, 2003)

Give the page number or page numbers where you found the information you are citing.

Julian Barnes. Something to Declare: Essays on France and French Culture. New York: Vintage Books, 2003), 136.

Bibliographical Entry

Give the author's last name separated by a comma from his first name.

Barnes, Julian.

Put the title of the book in italics.

Barnes, Julian. Something to Declare: Essays on France and French Culture.

Give the following publication information: the place of publication, the publisher and the year of publication. Do not enclose any of these items in parentheses in your bibliographical entry.

Barnes, Julian. Something to Declare: Essays on France and French Culture. New York: Vintage Books, 2003.

Tip
  • Kate Turabian, a secretary at the university, compiled "A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations," which is an adaptation of Chicago Style for undergraduate use. You can apply the above information about Chicago Style citation to "Turabian" Style citation as well.
References
  • "Chicago Manual of Style"; Editors of the Chicago Manual of Style; 2010
  • "A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations"; Kate L. Turabian, Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb and Joseph M. Williams; 2007
About the Author

Thomas Colbyry is a writer living in Marquette, Mich. Currently pursuing a B.A. in English, he works as a writing tutor and contributes book reviews to several publications. Colbyry often covers topics related to literature, specializing in early modern, Restoration, 18th-century and Victorian British literature, as well as the literature of Japan.

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