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How to Write a Proposal on How to Change Policy in the Public Sector


Proposals seek to address a specific problem by suggesting a possible solution to that problem. Proposals that suggest changing a policy in the public sector seek to alter guidelines pertaining to laws governing production or distribution of goods to the local, state or national government. Writing a proposal to change policy in the public sector, therefore, identifies a problem with instituting procedural change, and attempts to fix that problem.

Introduce your proposal with an overview of the present guidelines for procedural change pertaining to public sector policy. Emphasize potential problems that arise because of these guidelines. For example, if your municipality is only able to change its policies for goods allocation when a referendum vote is taken, you might include information pertaining the amount of meeting time that is used calling for and carrying out these types of votes.

Specify the problems pertaining to the current procedures for changing public policy. Emphasize the amount of time, energy and money that are wasted by employing said procedures.

List your proposal’s objectives. Typically, proposal objectives are broken down into three categories: review of the problem, evaluation of the problem and possible solutions.

Explain several possible solutions to the problem you’ve identified. At least one of the solutions should be making no procedural changes to the policy, while a second should be to scrap the entire process for changing policies, as both are potentially viable. Include your solution if it does not coincide with one of these two extremes.

Describe how you believe the procedural change in policy should take place. Because your proposal on how to change policy actually represents a change in policy, it will need to be submitted and considered by the policy procedures it seeks to alter.

Conclude your proposal by reiterating the problem in procedure your proposal addresses, as well as the bureaucratic problems created by the current policy-change procedure. Summarize your proposal’s procedural suggestion and explain who it will benefit in the public sector and how it will benefit them.

References
  • "Technical Communication: A Reader Centered Approach (Seventh Edition)"; Paul V. Anderson; 2010
  • "Managing the Public Sector"; Grover Starling; 2010
About the Author

Samuel Hamilton has been writing since 2002. His work has appeared in “The Penn,” “The Antithesis,” “New Growth Arts Review" and “Deek” magazine. Hamilton holds a Master of Arts in English education from the University of Pittsburgh, and a Master of Arts in composition from the University of Florida.

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