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How to Write a Conclusion for an Expository Essay


Writing a solid expository essay takes time, thought and effort. It is no small task to develop a strong thesis statement, gather and evaluate evidence to support your thesis and present your argument in a coherent manner. Once you craft the introduction and body of your essay, you may feel tempted to jot off a bland conclusion that does little more than restate your thesis. In reality, your conclusion is your chance to expose the larger implications of your thesis. Don't deny your reader the opportunity to learn something deeper about your topic. Instead, take the time to write a conclusion that leaves a lasting impression.

Develop and present your concluding thoughts in the form of a complete paragraph. There are no hard and fast rules about how long your conclusion needs to be, but strive to craft a fully developed concluding paragraph. Make sure your concluding remarks flow logically.

Avoid introducing new information into your concluding paragraph. Instead, bring together all the main points of your introduction and body and use a unifying conclusion to tie up any loose ends. Synthesize the information you have already presented in your essay and draw a conclusion based on what you now know.

Remind the reader of the central point of your thesis statement, but avoid restating your thesis word for word. Vary your language.

Avoid summarizing the material you presented in the introduction and body of your essay. Consider your conclusion an opportunity to reflect on your arguments and to offer one final, closing point.

Ask yourself meaningful questions about the material you presented and provide the answers in your conclusion. How is the information you presented relevant to you and your reader? What are the deeper implications of your thesis statement? What is the overall importance of your discussion?

Leave an impression. Recommend a specific course of action, answer any questions you may have posed in your introduction, reflect on any experiences you may have recorded in the body of your essay or offer one final telling example.

About the Author

Judy Fisk has been writing professionally since 2011, specializing in fitness, recreation, culture and the arts. A certified fitness instructor with decades of dance training, she has taught older adults, teens and kids. She has written educational and fundraising material for several non-profit organizations and her work has appeared in numerous major online publications. Fisk holds a Bachelor of Arts in public and international affairs from Princeton University.

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