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How to Write a Good Book Talk


A book talk is an activity that is often used in middle school to encourage students to read more books in their spare time. Book talks have the goal of sharing books with students in hopes that they will find the book interesting and read it. Book talks are important for students who have no knowledge of the books available to students or for students who are curious about various genres or specific themes.

Choose an appropriate book based on the audience the book talk is for. While some pick books for the vivid settings or the universal themes, others pick it because of the genre.

Read the chosen book and make notes about the things that are fun, enjoyable and memorable. Write details about these points, including the joyful things about each character, setting, plot, themes or personal connections.

Prepare the book talk script when the book has been read and the notes have been completed. Start by presenting the hook or high point of the book. These include hardships that need to be overcome or the biggest struggle / problem for the main character.

Write down the setting of the book and a list of the main characters. Include descriptions of each character in terms of their personalities, characteristics and appearances. As for the setting, describe how it is or is not realistic and what makes it interesting or exciting.

Examine the themes of the book and explain how the themes and the obstacles in the book go hand in hand. If this is a common problem for many, such as troubles in friendships or having nosy parents, this commonality is good to point out to relate it to the audience.

Choose a section of the book that is very exciting. This could be half a page to a page. Reading part of the book aloud may entice the audience and get them interested in what may or may not happen. Make sure not to reveal the ending.

Present the book talk script by discussing the themes, characters and settings outlined in the script prepared. Finish the book talk by sharing the part of the book chosen to read aloud. At the end, state the title and the author of the book. Finishing with a reading of the book will leave the audience with a reason to read the book.

Items you will need
Book of choice
Pencil
Paper
References
About the Author

Based in Toronto, Mary Jane has been writing for online magazines and databases since 2002. Her articles have appeared on the Simon & Schuster website and she received an editor's choice award in 2009. She holds a Master of Arts in psychology of language use from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.

Photo Credits
  • writing book image by AGphotographer from Fotolia.com