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How to Write a Memo Assignment


A memorandum, or memo, is a short document distributed in hard copy (though electronic memos exist as well) throughout an organization to remind employees of meetings, deadlines and other special events. While writing a memo isn't difficult, there is a specific format that official memos follow. Learning how to format and phrase a memo properly can help ensure the message you want to get across to your employees comes across clearly and effectively.

Left justify, each on its own line:

To: From: Date: Subject:

This information tells who the memo goes to, who it's from, when the memo was written, and what the subject of the memo is. Bold each of these elements.

Write the memo in either first or third person. Either of these can be used, depending upon the purpose of the memo. Using first person can be an effective way for the head of the company to get on a more personal level with employees. For subjects that are more relaxed, such as announcing a company party of picnic, first person might be a better choice. A mandatory meeting might benefit from a third person point of view, written with a more formal tone.

Keep the memo as short as possible. Between three and five paragraphs, each with between three and five sentences, is appropriate for most memos. Memos are meant to be short reminders. Be direct in the body of the memo. Get right to the point. If there are any special instructions, try listing them as bullet points when possible. End the memo with contact information for those who may have further questions.

Items you will need
Pencil
Paper
Word processor
About the Author

Carl Hose is the author of the anthology "Dead Horizon" and the the zombie novella "Dead Rising." His work has appeared in "Cold Storage," "Butcher Knives and Body Counts," "Writer's Journal," and "Lighthouse Digest.". He is editor of the "Dark Light" anthology to benefit Ronald McDonald House Charities.

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