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How to Write a Proposal Report


Reporting on a proposal requires summarization skills that are concise and to-the-point without leaving out any relevant detail or information. It requires skills in both effective reading and writing in order to fully and fairly report on a proposal's merits. Final decisions often hinge on a reviewer's overall report, so it's important to be as precise and organized as possible.

Write an introductory paragraph that summarizes the proposal's overall project description or idea. Describe the purpose, intended audience and what is needed to accomplish the established goal.

Describe in detail the proposal's overall method or proposed procedure. If there is an overarching theory, describe that, too. Detail any background and resources required to fulfill the project.

Evaluate the proposal's projected timeline as to how realistic it is and if it aligns with the outlined goals and purposes. Write a summation of the timeline and whether it aligns with the project's funding or budget.

Outline the proposed costs and resources necessary for project completion in detail. This could include consultants, equipment, supplies and anything else referenced in the budget. Include actual costs in addition to proposed costs. This might require some digging, but will be important to include.

Include a section listing the qualifications of the original proposal writer.

Include a section with the final proposal submissions checklist. Indicate what was included and what, if anything, was left out. Final decisions often hinge upon whether directions were followed and all proposal components are in place, especially when there is competition.

Include three sections based on the input of any other proposal reviewers and their recommendations, questions or comments on the proposed project. Include a section for each: Questions, Reviewer Comments and Recommendations.

Make a personal recommendation as to the proposal's merits, considering the proposed timeline, method, costs and overall project scope.

Tip
  • Highlight areas in the proposal or use Post-It notes to denote areas to include in your report.
Items you will need
Mac or PC
Microsoft Word
About the Author

Writing since 1984, Susan Deschel just published "Peer Coaching for Adolescent Writers" through Corwin Press, a handbook for teachers. Deschel has a bachelor's degree in creative writing, master's in education, and is currently working on her doctorate in curriculum and instruction. She writes in other genres, including fiction and poetry.

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