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How to Write an Essay on Why You Would Like to Be Selected to Attend a Leadership Institution


You always wanted to be a leader, but you weren’t sure how to get the training you need – that is, some formal training besides what you do regularly -- running extracurricular activities, organizing community activities and helping neighbors. Attending a leadership institution can hone your skills, develop your confidence and serve as a forum to meet other leaders. Many leadership institutions are highly selective and require applicants to write an essay as part of the selection process. A good essay will distinguish you from other applicants and will help make a winning case for the institution to admit you.

Learn as much you can about the leadership institution. Ask a counselor for information and request the institution’s guidebooks and brochures. Use online resources, such as the institution’s website, to augment your search. Speak with someone who was a previous attendee, so that you can get his take on the institution. A well-informed essay will increase your chances of admission.

Define leadership. Expand your definition of leadership beyond having the authority to boss around others. A leader supports and empowers those for whom he is responsible, and he helps others develop confidence in themselves. By expanding your understanding of leadership, you'll be better prepared to write the essay.

Write a strong thesis stating why the institution should accept you. Make your thesis clear and concise. Tell the admissions committee not only how you could benefit from the institution, but how the institution -- and the attendees -- could benefit from your presence.

Highlight your leadership experiences. Whether you were a scout leader or a student body president, demonstrate that you have experience in leadership. Include specific instances when you proved your leadership prowess, such as planning a bake sale or maintaining the school store.

Finish with a strong conclusion. Reinforce your leadership abilities in the final paragraph. Include information about your goals and how being a strong leader is critical to your success. Echoing your thesis, make a winning case for why the institution should accept you.

Tip
  • Proofread the essay. Let a friend or teacher look it over and provide corrections. An institution is more likely to consider a professional, well-written essay than a slipshod one.
Warning
  • Read the institution’s directions for the essay. Read them carefully. For example, if your essay is limited to 300 words, don't write a 400-word essay. Also, be sure you follow any required format, such as double spacing. You don’t want the institution to reject you on a technicality.
Items you will need
Word processor
Internet
About the Author

Jonathan Peters is a freelance journalist from Los Angeles. He has written professionally since 2006 for publications such as "The Ann Arbor News," "The Swarthmore Phoenix," "The Swarthmore Daily Gazette" and "Current," a newsmagazine for college students produced by "Newsweek." Peters holds a Bachelor of Arts in history from Swarthmore College.

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