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How to Write a Memo to Request a Service


A memorandum, or memo, differs from a formal letter principally in its brevity. Because memos are meant to be read quickly, they typically get straight to the point, leaving out excessive pleasantries and personal information. Companies usually use memos to communicate internally, so it may be more appropriate to write a formal request letter if you wish to request a service from an individual or organization outside your company.

Important Information to Include

Write the "To" field of the memo, which contains the name of the person or organization to whom you address the memo. For example: "To: Amanda Marley, General Manager."

Write the "From" field of the memo, in which you state your name. You should also include your job title or department.

Write the full date on which you are composing the memo in the "Date" field.

Write the subject of the memo in the "Subject" field. An appropriate subject for a memo is a brief statement of its purpose. For example: "Request for Audit of November Reports." Every memo should include a subject.

The Body of the Memo

Introduce the request you wish to make directly in the first sentence or paragraph of the memo. It is not necessary,or typically appropriate, to begin with personal pleasantries such as "How are you?" or "I hope you and your family had an enjoyable holiday." Memos usually begin with a statement of purpose, often using the phrase "I am writing to..."

Provide all pertinent details of the service you request, including specific instructions and deadlines, after introducing the purpose of the memo.

Sign your name at the bottom if you wish. This is optional, since you already stated your name in the "From" field.

Review and proofread your email. Remove extraneous information to ensure that the memo is simple and easy to understand.

Tips
  • Keep sentences and paragraphs short.
  • Ideally, the total length of the memo should be under one page.
About the Author

Casey Anderson began writing newspaper stories in 2004 at the "Independent Florida Alligator" and the "Advocate." He has published research in the "Journal of Undergraduate Research" and fiction in the "Mangrove Literary Review." He also works as an ESL teacher and designs courses for language learners. He studied English at the University of Florida.

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