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How to Write a Speech About Someone Else


During your career, you may be required to write a speech about someone else for many reasons. It may be to honor someone at a retirement function or give the final remembrances in a eulogy. Making it a good speech can lead to many positives, including career advancement, touching sentiments and positive memories for everyone.

Research the background of your subject. It doesn't matter whether the speech is career-driven or based on personal achievements; more information to start with is better.

Define the purpose of the speech. Although this may seem like common sense, it needs to be examined. Understanding how long the speech needs to be and why the subject is being discussed is imperative to choosing the proper information to extract in Step 1.

Define the relationship the writer has with the subject. This relationship, though not part of the speech, can be a poignant example of why the subject deserves accolades.

Review the location and setting of the speech. Formal dinners are much different than a company sales meeting. Understand what formalities need to be included in the speech to add the right touch of professionalism. For instance, a casual speech may not require formal acknowledgments of guests and hosts.

Extract information that illustrates the intent of the speech. A person receiving a service achievement award deserves a speech that demonstrates her dedication to the community while using education and career as a highlight. A speech for the recipient of a sales award would discuss more of the subject's career and educational achievements, and use personal anecdotes to show he is well-rounded.

Don't use humor that isn't 100 percent acceptable. It isn't necessary to start a speech with a joke to break the ice, nor is it smart to use humorous stories about the subject unless they are widely known and accepted. Think about who is listening and who else might be embarrassed by a story, such as a spouse, boss or someone else who might not find it tasteful. When in doubt, stick with sincerity.

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About the Author

With more than 15 years of professional writing experience, Kimberlee finds it fun to take technical mumbo-jumbo and make it fun! Her first career was in financial services and insurance.