How to Submit Movie Ideas to Hollywood

Updated February 21, 2017

Waitresses, cab drivers, professional athletes, police officers, you name it: people from a variety of backgrounds and professions have great ideas for movies. Most people, however, rarely see the opportunity to pitch a story that will turn into a movie. To submit movie ideas to a Hollywood studio, the simplest approach is to contact one of the many production companies located on Hollywood studio lots to request a pitch meeting or sell your idea by phone.

Research your movie idea before contacting a production company. Ensure that a similar title is not already in production by visiting a movie database website such as Imdb.com or Studiosystem.com. You must be sure that your idea is original prior to submission.

Practice your pitch. A pitch is a description of your idea that sells your movie. Preparation of your idea is essential in building your pitch because you want to sell a relevant, engaging and original concept. Practice selling your story in less than a minute with friends and family who will give you honest feedback on your idea and delivery.

Locate a copy of an entertainment industry phone book such as the Hollywood Creative Directory, which lists addresses, staff and titles, email addresses and websites, phone and fax numbers, credits and studio deals of movie industry executives and producers.

Contact a production company. Hollywood studios typically work with agents, managers and established producers rather than the general public. If you are an unrepresented artist, try contacting a smaller production company that works in conjunction with the studios to call and pitch your movie idea as they are constantly seeking new concepts to turn into movies. Before calling, ensure you have researched the genre of movies the production company has produced and employees of the company.

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Tips

  • If you are in the Los Angeles area, you can find copies of the Hollywood Creative Directory to browse through at local bookstores, college campuses and sometimes even libraries.

Warnings

  • Getting a pitch meeting in Hollywood is highly competitive and you may have to sell your idea to an administrative assistant or intern who screen calls for producers. Be prepared and practice speaking with brevity and confidence.

Things Needed

  • Phone
  • Internet access

About the Author

Lanae Carr has been an entertainment and lifestyle writer since 2002. She began as a staff writer for the entertainment section of the "Emory Wheel" and she writes for various magazines and e-newsletters related to marketing and entertainment. Carr graduated from Emory University with a bachelor's degree in film studies and English.